Robots support popularity of sushi

英文和文

Sushi ranked top in the list of favorite Japanese foods released in 2007 by the NHK Broadcasting Culture Research Institute. Sushi is now a global word indicating it is also quite popular outside Japan. What supports its bursting popularity is the sushi robot. Suzumo Machinery Co., a relatively small firm with 316 employees headquartered in Tokyo’s Nerima, boasts an overwhelming 60% of the Japanese sushi robot market.

The company, originally a confectionery equipment manufacturer, started developing sushi robots only in recent years by capitalizing on its state-of-the-art rice cooking technology. Its project was prompted by Japan’s “rice glut” created by the government’s controversial policy of reducing the rice acreage in the 1970s. Kisaku Suzuki, the founder of the company, thought that a better use of rice might be possible to turn sushi, which had been eaten only on special occasions, into a casual daily food.

After repeating improvements on ways to make small shari (vinegared rice) balls and put neta (fish and shellfish toppings) on them, the company began marketing in 1981 its “Shari Ben Robo” and a few other robot models that can figure out the accurate amount of rice. Ikuya Oneda, who succeeded Suzuki as president in 2004, hit on an idea of marketing those products in the rest of the world. In the meantime, sushi kept on establishing its image overseas as a typical Japanese food. In fact, about 60% of Japanese restaurants in New York have sushi on their menu, according to data made available in 2006 by the Japanese Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries. Oneda’s strategy was just in line with the trend of the times.

Oneda was quoted by Bloomberg News as saying in 2013 that his company planned to treble its annual exports of sushi robots to 3,000 units by taking advantage of the ongoing boom of Japanese food abroad. One of his firm’s sushi robots is compatible with seven languages of English, French, German, Spanish, Korean, Chinese and Japanese. Furthermore, in response to foreign consumers who dislike nori (dried laver), the company has developed a robot to make California Rolls, which are either crab-flavored kamaboko (fish sausage), avocado, mayonnaise, white sesame etc. rolled with laver or laver put inside.

That way, Suzumo has played a significant role in boosting the popularity of sushi with its new idea of robotics. It has quickly detected the trend of the times and made constant efforts to deliver products fit for the times to the consumers. One may expect the company will make another leap forward in the future.

(Written by: Meiku Takeda)

NHK放送文化研究所が2007年に発表した日本人の好きな食べ物ランキングで、寿司はトップにランクされている。またSUSHIは国際語になるほど海外でも人気を得ている。その発展を支えているのが、機械が握る寿司ロボットだ。このロボット製造で国内市場の6割を占めているのが、東京都練馬区に本社を置く鈴茂器工株式会社だ。

同社(従業員316人)は、もともと製菓用の機械を製造していたが、米飯業界最先端の技術を使って寿司ロボットを造り始めたのは近年になってから。契機は1970年代の減反政策による「コメ余り」現象だ。創業者の鈴木喜作氏は米を活用して、庶民が特別なときにしか食べなかった寿司を日常的な料理として定着させることはできないか考えた。

同社は1981年、しゃりの握り方、ネタの載せ方の改良を重ね、正確な計測で米を盛り付ける「シャリ弁ロボ」などを国内向けに製造販売した。寿司ロボットの世界展開を構想したのは、2004年に鈴木氏の後を継ぎ代表取締役社長に就任した小根田育治氏。海外でも日本食といえば寿司というイメージが定着した。ニューヨークの日本食レストランの約6割が寿司専門店とメニューに寿司が載っている店だという統計がある(2006年農林水産省調べ)。小根田氏の戦略はまさに時代の流れに則したものだった。

小根田氏によると、同社は海外の日本食ブームを背景に、海外向け製品の販売を現在の3倍の3000台に増やす計画という(2013年ブルームバーグ・ニュース)。同社のある小型寿司ロボットは、英語、フランス語、ドイツ語、スペイン語、韓国語、中国語、日本語の7カ国語に対応できるという。また、「海苔は苦手」という海外の消費者の声を聞き、カリフォルニア・ロール(カニ風味かまぼこ、アボカド、マヨネーズ、白ゴマなどを、表巻き、または裏巻きにしたものを言う)を巻くロボットも開発した。

以上のように、鈴茂器工はロボットという新しいアイデアで、寿司の人気上昇に一役買っている。時代の流れをいち早く察知し、時代に合った商品を消費者に常に届けてきた。今後のさらなる飛躍に期待したい。(武田芽育)

コメントを残す

メールアドレスが公開されることはありません。 * が付いている欄は必須項目です